Mass schedule: Saturday @ 5 pm Sunday 8, 9:30, & 11:15 am.  Everyone can celebrate Mass from your car in Our Lady of Guadalupe parking lot. 

Tune in on the radio at FM 107.3

We are turning on the outside speakers for parishioners to listen to Mass in their vehicles.

*Anyone attending Mass is required to wear a mask, and maintain a 6 feet social distance.

Serving the Communities of Bosque Farms, Peralta, & Valencia

Online Giving (Sunday Collections)

Annual Catholic Appeal

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Upcoming Events

All Events are cancelled until further notice. 

Publications


  • Sun, Nov 22nd

Mass Times

Saturday: Peralta 5:00 p.m
Sunday: Peralta 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11:15 a.m.
Weekdays Tuesday - Friday 8:00 a.m.

Confessions:
By appointment at this time

Baptisms: Saturdays at 10 am, call the Office to schedule

Staff

Office Hours

Church Office Hours : Monday - Friday
9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m
Telephone : 505-869-2189

Father Emmanuel UC Izuka's Office Hours:
Tuesday- Friday
9:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. or by appointment
Telephone: 505-869-2189

Faith Formation Office Hours
Summer Office Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am-1:00 pm
Telephone: 505-869-6993

Church Open: Monday- Friday
9:00 a.m.- 1:00 pm. (please contact the office prior to coming, so church will be unlocked)

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OLOG Peralta

Parish News

Exciting news starting this Saturday our Masses will resume our regular Mass schedule.  Saturday @ 5 pm Sunday 8, 9:30, & 11:15 am.  Everyone can celebrate Mass from your car in Our Lady of Guadalupe parking lot. Hope to see you there!

Our Lady of Guadalupe Youth Ministry Blanket Drive. Please bring your donation of new or gently used blankets and quilts to: Parish Office 9am to 12pm Tuesday –Friday or Drive by and Drop Off on Saturday, December 5, 2020 from 10am to 11Noon at 48 Bloom N Shine, Los Lunas. For more information please call Bernadette Jaramillo at 505-859-0557.  Donations for Valencia County Domestic Violence Shelter and Care Net.

Our parish goal for this year’s Annual Catholic Appeal is $35,000. And as you all know, the ACA supports many ministries in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, especially the education and training of priests and permanent deacons. It supports the poor and the needy program as well as numerous other areas of need in the Archdiocese. We all know how it works, if we meet our assigned goal and perhaps go over it, we will get the balance in a rebate. If we do not meet our goal, we will have to pay the balance from our purse. I call on all parishioners to pray about this and make your donation and may the good Lord bless and reward you as you do this. Thank you.

It is with tremendous thought along with the health & safety of our friends and family at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in mind that we must inform you that this years' Wreaths Across America Ceremony is cancelled. For any questions or concerns please contact Ceremony Coordinator Patsy Vega at (505) 340-4088. 

 

Saint of the Day

St. Columbanus

An originator of Ireland's unique monastic tradition, who went on to serve as a missionary to continental Europe during the early Middle Ages, the abbot Saint Columbanus – also known as St. Columban – is honored by the Catholic Church on Nov. 23.

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Pope St. Clement I

On Nov. 23 Roman Catholics remember the fourth Pope, St. Clement I, a disciple of the apostles who inherited the authority of St. Peter in the first century. Eastern Catholics celebrate his feast on Nov. 25. The details of Clement's life, before his conversion and even afterward, are largely unknown. Some aspects of his writings have led scholars to believe that the fourth Pope either came from a Jewish background, or had converted to Judaism earlier in life before entering the Catholic Church. Tradition suggests that Clement was the son of a Roman named Faustinus, and that he joined the Church in Rome during its early years through the preaching of Saint Peter or Saint Paul. He went on to share in the missionary journeys of the apostles, and may even have assisted the first Pope in running the Church on a local level. After the deaths of St. Peter's first two successors, the canonized Popes Linus and Cletus, Clement took up St. Peter's position of primacy in the Church around the year 90. One of his most important tasks, during nearly 10 years as Pope, was to resolve serious problems in the Church of Corinth, which St. Paul had also struggled to discipline.Clement's own letter to the Corinthians, though not part of the biblical canon, offers an important look at the role of authority and charity in the early Church. Its introduction suggests that Pope Clement composed it while his own local Church faced persecution from the Roman Emperor Domitian.In the letter, the Pope describes how the Corinthians had once been “distinguished by humility,” being “in no respect puffed up with pride” and “more willing to give than to receive.” But in time, “the worthless rose up against the honored, those of no reputation against such as were renowned, the foolish against the wise, the young against those advanced in years.”“Let us give up vain and fruitless cares, and approach to the glorious and venerable rule of our holy calling,” Pope Clement wrote in his call to repentance. “Let us attend to what is good, pleasing, and acceptable in the sight of him who formed us.”Order and discipline, he noted, are at least as important in the Church as they are in the rest of creation, where the powers of nature follow God's decrees. The Pope also warned the Corinthians to follow “those who cultivate peace with godliness,” rather than “those who hypocritically profess to desire it.”The Church Clement headed was one that honored tradition and right order as fundamentals of its life.“It behooves us to do all things in order, which the Lord has commanded us to perform at stated times,” he told the Corinthians. God, he said, “has enjoined offerings and service to be performed ... not thoughtlessly or irregularly, but at the appointed times and hours.”“Where and by whom (God) desires these things to be done, he himself has fixed by his own supreme will, in order that all things being piously done according to his good pleasure, may be acceptable to him.”The fourth Pope's writings reveal much about the early Church, but little about his own life. According to one later account, he died in exile during the reign of the Emperor Trajan, who purportedly banished Clement to Crimea (near modern Ukraine) and had him killed in retaliation for evangelizing the local people. In 868 the Greek missionary St. Cyril claimed to have recovered St. Clement's bones.St. Clement I probably died around the year 100. He is among the saints mentioned in the Western Church's most traditional Eucharistic prayer, the Roman Canon.

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Blessed Miguel Pro Juarez

Born in Guadalupe on January 13, 1891, Miguel Pro Juarez was one of 11 children. Miguel was, from an early age, intensely spiritual and equally intense in his mischievousness, frequently exasperating his family with his humor and practical jokes. As a child he had a daring precociousness that sometimes went too far, tossing him into near death accidents and illnesses. Miguel was particularly close to his older sister, and after she entered a cloistered convent he began to discern his own vocation, leading him to enter the Jesuit novitiate in El Llano, Michoacan at the age of 20. He studied in Mexico until 1914 when a tidal wave of governmental anti-Catholicism crashed down upon Mexico, forcing the order to flee to Los Gates, California. He then taught in Nicaragua from 1919 until 1922.By the time Fr. Pro was ordained a priest in Enghien, Belgium in 1925, the political situation in Mexico had deteriorated: all Catholic churches were closed, bishops, priests, and religious were rounded up for deportation or imprisonment, and those caught trying to elude capture were shot. The celebration of the sacraments was punishable by imprisonment or death, and the Church was driven underground. Fr. Pro received permission from his superiors to return to Mexico incognito and to carry on his ministry undercover. Fr. Pro slipped into Mexico City and immediately began celebrating Mass and distributing the sacraments, often under imminent threat of discovery by a police force charged with the task of ferreting out hidden pockets of Catholicism. He became known throughout the city as the undercover priest who would show up in the middle of the night dressed as a beggar or a street sweeper to baptize infants, hear confessions, distribute Communion, or perform marriages. Several times, disguised as a policeman, he slipped unnoticed into the police headquarters itself to bring the sacraments to Catholic prisoners before their execution. Using clandestine meeting places, a wardrobe of disguises and coded messages to the underground Catholics, Fr. Pro carried on his priestly work for the Mexican faithful under his care.A failed attempt in November 1927 to assassinate the President of Mexico which only wounded him provided the state with a pretext for arresting Fr. Pro with his brothers Humberto and Roberto. They were put in jail and held without trial for ten days, accused of the attempted assassination. On July 17, 1928, President Calles ordered Fr. Pro to be executed, ostensibly for his role in the assassination plot, but in reality for his defiance of the laws banning Catholicism. As Fr. Pro walked from his cell to the prison courtyard, he blessed the firing squad and then knelt and prayed silently for a few moments. Refusing a blindfold, he stood, faced the firing squad, and with a crucifix in one hand and a rosary in the other, he held his arms outstretched in the form of a cross and in a loud, clear voice cried out, "May God have mercy on you! May God bless you! Lord, Thou knowest that I am innocent! With all my heart I forgive my enemies!" As the soldiers lifted their rifles, he exclaimed in a loud voice, "Viva Cristo Rey!" - "Long live Christ the King!" A volley rang out and Fr. Pro fell to the ground riddled with bullets. A solider stepped up and discharged his rifle at point blank range into the priest’s temple. 30,000 people attended his funeral procession. Fr. Miguel Pro was beatified on September 25, 1988 by Pope John Paul II.Fr. Pro used his natural gifts of intense determination and courage, seen throughout all parts of his life, to further the kingdom of God. Modern Catholics may follow Fr. Pro by taking courage and using their natural talents and gifts as God asks of them.

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